What's the problem?

Why should anyone worry about diversity?

Are You Surface Acting At Work?

An interview with Dr. Sarah Rose Cavanagh, associate professor of psychology at Assumption College about how surface acting affects employees.

Gender Differences in Recognition for Group Work

Academic study of the question: How is credit for group work allocated when individual contributions are not perfectly observed?

Why Women Are Tired: The Price of Unpaid Emotional Labor

A psychotherapist recounts stories of emotional exhaustion and its social causes.

Recognizing the Role of Emotional Labor in the On-Demand Economy

On-demand workers end up performing outsize amounts of what sociologists call “emotional labor,” or expressive work to make the customer experience a positive one so that users come back to the platform. This work extends beyond good customer service: It involves actively reshaping a worker’s inner emotional life to conform to employers’ and customers’ expectations of emotional performance.

Please Stop Calling Everything That Frustrates You Emotional Labor

A counter to many recent articles that tries to recenter the conversation about emotional labor onto issues of patriarchy.

“Where’s My Cut?”: On Unpaid Emotional Labor

Seminal article from the now-defunct The Toast on how emotional labor is and expected and unpaid aspect of women's roles.

The men’s guide to understanding emotional labor

As a bro-y yet sensitive guy who cares about gender equality, I’ve always been apprehensive about entering the fray on gender issues. But in a #MeToo world, choosing to stay in my lane to avoid being criticized just doesn’t feel like an option. Deep inside, I knew this was a conversation that I needed to be a part of. And so began the laborious act of understanding emotional labor—and now I’m convinced that this is a conversation everyone needs to be a part of.

Emotional Labor of Software Engineers

The concept of emotional labor, introduced by Hochschild in 1983, refers to the “process by which workers are expected to manage their feelings in accordance with organizationally defined rules and guidelines”. For instance, judges are expected to appear impartial, nurses—compassionate and police officers—authoritative.

Project Implicit - Implicit Association Tests

Much of the conversation around diversity presupposes that people are not always consistent in what they believe. While a person may work to consciously believe in racial equality--for example, due to their upbringing, friendships, experiences, or any number of factors--they may unconsciously carry around negative associations and stereotypes about a particular group.

But how can we recognize what our own biases are?