What's the problem?

Why should anyone worry about diversity?

Much of the conversation around diversity presupposes that people are not always consistent in what they believe. While a person may work to consciously believe in racial equality--for example, due to their upbringing, friendships, experiences, or any number of factors--they may unconsciously carry around negative associations and stereotypes about a particular group.

But how can we recognize what our own biases are?

Tracey Ross discusses the many ways people of color are marginalized in the supposedly "meritocratic" tech world, including basic access to technology, pattern matching at venture capital firms, and more. 

Shanley Kane discusses the perils of becoming visible on the internet for marginalized people in tech. 

This article shares a lot of fundamental concepts and resources for those wanting to be better allies.

Kronda Adair writes about anger in social justice work--not as a harmful side effect, but as the primary driver of this work. 

This article from Harvard Business Review by Todd L. Pittinsky posits that traditional diversity arguments have not convinced Silicon Valley about diversity's value because Silicon Valley is among the most innovative in technology while remaining the least diverse.

This article from McKinsey & Company by Vivian Hunt reports on the research which says that companies with greater diversity have greater financial returns.

This article by Shana Lebowitz describes the results of a MIT and Georgetown study which found that, despite being happier when working with people of the same gender, gender-diverse teams were more productive.

Sylvia Ann Hewlett, Melinda Marshall, and Laura Sherbin provide an overview of the research which shows evidence that diversity unlocks innovation.

Researchers find software repository GitHub approved code written by women at a higher rate than code written by men, but only if the gender was not disclosed.