Harassment

How “Good Intent” Undermines Diversity and Inclusion

Focusing on intent allows people to avoid accountability for real harm caused, whether intentional or not.

"Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced, and Underprotected" by the African American Policy Forum

In 2014, a 12-year-old girl faced expulsion and criminal charges after writing “hi” on a locker room wall of her Georgia middle school, and a Detroit honors student was suspended for her entire senior year for accidently bringing a pocketknife to a football game.

"The Learning Circle Toolkit" by the The African American Policy Forum

The Learning Circle Toolkit is the result of a collaborative project undertaken by the African American Policy Forum, generously funded by the Public Welfare Foundation.  We gathered together a group of scholars, activists, community leaders, and students who were actively involved in combating systemic racial and gender injustice at both the community and national level, with special focus on the over incarceration of girls and women of color in the United States.  Our collaborators came from diverse backgrounds and brought a wealth of experiences with them to our Learning Circles.

Categories
Harassment, Privilege, Race

Sexual Harassment of Women: Climate, Culture, and Consequences in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

System-wide changes to the culture and climate in higher education are needed to prevent and effectively respond to sexual harassment. There is no evidence that current policies, procedures, and approaches—which often focus on symbolic compliance with the law and on avoiding liability—have resulted in a significant reduction in sexual harassment.

Does Your Institution Foster a Culture of Sexual Harassment?

A new report outlines how academic institutions create a culture in which sexual harassment can run rampant. Here are some questions, drawn from the report, to help gauge your institution’s culture.

Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence against Women of Color by Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw

Over the last two decades, women have organized against the almost routine violence that shapes their lives. Drawing from the strength of shared experience, women have recognized that the political demands of millions speak more powerfully than the pleas of a few isolated voices. This politicization in turn has transformed the way we understand violence against women. For example, battering and rape, once seen as private (family matters) and aberrational (errant sexual aggression), are now largely recognized as part of a broad-scale system of domination that affects women as a class.

Reducing Harassment In Science: Funding Follows Trainees

This is the fifth post in a series suggesting changes to the systems of scientific training that may reduce the frequency or severity of harassment and discrimination against scientific trainees. Part 1 is herePart 2 is here

Responding to Hostile Behaviors

Responding to hostile behaviors requires a community effort and strong leadership to send a clear message that these types of behaviors are not acceptable. Here you will find strategies to address incidents when they happen through bystander intervention as well as resources for changing the culture so that these behaviors do not continue to be tolerated. A broad response is necessary for long-lasting change and this should start with supporting the people being targeted by harassers.

How To Create A Culture Of Safety With Bystander Intervention Training

Miller offers the advice of experts not to confront the harasser in the moment (I assume she means in circumstances where the victim is not in peril), and instead suggests a variety of tactics:

• Distract the harasser: The bystander can address the victim directly and pull them out of the situation.

• Confront the harasser: Reflect on what you saw and ask them about it.

• Check in with the victim: Ask how they are and make sure they know they did nothing wrong.

Know Your Rights: Witnessing Sexual Harassment at Work

What Is Workplace Sexual Harassment?

Sexual harassment is a type of sex discrimination that violates federal law under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Illegal workplace sexual harassment can happen between people of the same gender, different genders, coworkers, an employee and a client or customer, or an employee and their supervisor, among others. Harassment can occur almost anywhere, including in the workplace, at a work-related event outside of the workplace, or during work travel.

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