Race

Much of the conversation around diversity presupposes that people are not always consistent in what they believe. While a person may work to consciously believe in racial equality--for example, due to their upbringing, friendships, experiences, or any number of factors--they may unconsciously carry around negative associations and stereotypes about a particular group.

But how can we recognize what our own biases are?

PDF essay excerpted from Working Paper 189. "White Privilege and Male Privilege: A Personal Account
of Coming To See Correspondences through Work in Women's Studies" (1988), by Peggy McIntosh.

David A. Graham writes a piece that examines the role of monuments dedicated to the Confederacy and the struggle to take them down. These monuments commemorate a society that explicitly enslaved people on the basis of race, in a manner inconsistent with modern values, yet the monuments persist. Graham articulates the connection between these monuments and race, and examines alternatives that might remember the Confederacy without glorifying it.

Tracey Ross discusses the many ways people of color are marginalized in the supposedly "meritocratic" tech world, including basic access to technology, pattern matching at venture capital firms, and more. 

This personal essay describes the intersecting microaggressions experienced by the author, a black trans man working in tech, and the negative impact they have on him and other marginalized people in tech. 

#YesWeCode is a national initiative to help 100,000 young women and men from underrepresented backgrounds find success in the tech sector.

Code For Progress is a nonprofit organization that offers formalized coding training programs to women and people of color. We are based in Washington, DC and work with students, professionals, and organizations nationwide. (text from website)

Categories
Ethnicity, Race

Black Girls CODE is devoted to showing the world that black girls can code, and do so much more. By reaching out to the community through workshops and after school programs, Black Girls CODE introduces computer coding lessons to young girls from underrepresented communities in programming languages such as Scratch or Ruby on Rails. (from the website)

Ashe Dryden's curated list of introductory and advanced-level books on intersectionality, feminism, womanism, and social justice.

Racial Equity Tools is designed to support individuals and groups working to achieve racial equity. This site offers tools, research, tips, curricula and ideas for people who want to increase their own understanding and to help those working toward justice at every level – in systems, organizations, communities and the culture at large.