Studies & academia

Reducing Harassment In Science: Funding Follows Trainees

This is the fifth post in a series suggesting changes to the systems of scientific training that may reduce the frequency or severity of harassment and discrimination against scientific trainees. Part 1 is herePart 2 is here

Decolonising Science Reading List

There are two different angles at play in the discussion about colonialism and science. First is what constitutes scientific epistemology and what its origins are. As a physicist, I was taught that physics began with the Greeks and later Europeans inherited their ideas and expanded on them.

Technovation

Every year, Technovation invites teams of girls from all over the world to learn and apply the skills needed to solve real-world problems through technology.

Advancing Racial Literacy in Tech

In their new paper Advancing Racial Literacy in Tech (PDF), Jessie Daniels, Mutale Nkonde, and Darakhshan Mir urge tech companies to adopt racial literacy practices in order to break out of old patterns.

Gender Differences in Recognition for Group Work

Academic study of the question: How is credit for group work allocated when individual contributions are not perfectly observed?

Roads and Bridges: The Unseen Labor Behind Our Digital Infrastructure

Funded report about the challenges facing open source software and sustainability when free labor is exploited by businesses that do not contribute.

The Evolution of Emotional Displays in Open Source Software Development Teams: An Individual Growth Curve Analysis

An academic study of emotion in OSS groups.

(PDF) The Evolution of Emotional Displays in Open Source Software Development Teams: An Individual Growth Curve Analysis. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/324831951/download

Double Jeopardy? Gender Bias Against Women in Science

Academic report about gender and racial bias in STEM fields. Intersectional study of barriers in STEM fields.

Emotional Labor of Software Engineers

The concept of emotional labor, introduced by Hochschild in 1983, refers to the “process by which workers are expected to manage their feelings in accordance with organizationally defined rules and guidelines”. For instance, judges are expected to appear impartial, nurses—compassionate and police officers—authoritative.

The Stubborn Persistence of Confederate Monuments

David A. Graham writes a piece that examines the role of monuments dedicated to the Confederacy and the struggle to take them down. These monuments commemorate a society that explicitly enslaved people on the basis of race, in a manner inconsistent with modern values, yet the monuments persist. Graham articulates the connection between these monuments and race, and examines alternatives that might remember the Confederacy without glorifying it.

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