Resources

This page is for collecting any links to educational materials that explain the importance of inclusion and how to make one’s work or organization more diverse. Please add suggestions!

What White Privilege Really Means — and How to Work on It

A well resourced and comprehensive article for people new to race and privilege discussions.

Categories
Privilege, Race

Anti-racism resources for white people

An excellent collection of resources including articles, podcasts, videos, books, and more for white people (especially parents) to learn about systemic racism.

By The Numbers: What Pay Inequality Looks Like For Women In Tech

A solid overview of the documented inequality in pay for women and other marginalized groups, as well as some specific suggestions for how companies can fix it.

Princeton Land Acknowledgement Guidelines

The following guidelines are designed to assist with preparation and delivery of land acknowledgements.

Categories
Inclusion

The role of straight white men in diversity & inclusion

This article is a good beginner-level approach to diversity & inclusion. It could be useful for sharing with straight white cis male colleagues and friends who feel skeptical, defensive, or powerless to change.

Speaker Diversity Workshop training deck

Jill Binder wrote a training deck for the Speaker Diversity Workshop in the Drupal space. Speaker notes were added to the slide deck.

This resource is for anyone who wants to give the training at a local camp, meetup, etc.

Empowering Women in Business: Statistics on Women Inclusion in the Workplace

Women don't simply participate in the U.S. workforce. The contributions of women to industries and professions of all types now rival — and in some fields surpass — those of their male counterparts.

Consider these statistics from the U.S. Department of Labor: - 6 million women are in the U.S. workforce, representing almost 47% of all workers. - Three out of four women with children under the age of 18 are in the workforce. - Nearly four times as many women with children under the age of 18 are the sole earners for their households (40%) than their counterparts in 1960 (11%).